Background

U.S. officials are continuing to monitor and respond to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in China and which has now been detected and spreading in locations internationally – including in the United States. The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”).

The United States Conference of Mayors has a long history of working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and multiple Administrations in preparing or responding to past infectious disease outbreaks. Thus, we hope the information on this page below serves as a resource for you, city staff, and agency leadership as you continue to keep your residents and businesses best informed and prepared related to this evolving threat.

In addition to the resources here, we encourage mayors to join the Bloomberg Philathropies Coronavirus Local Response Initiative. Learn more here.

Additional Links

Equipment Survey
Supplies for Cities
Mayors Business Council Actions
CARES Act (Third Supplemental) Overview

For More Information

Dalen HarrisAssistant Executive Director for Children, Health, and Human Services

Operational Best Practices for Mayors

Coordinate

Coordinate your area local governments and ensure you are speaking with one voice.

Declaration

Find out now what your powers would be under a state of emergency and consider declaring one, if you haven’t done so already.

Transparency

Be transparent and honest with the people in your community – transparency can be an effective antidote to fear.

Capacity

Talk to your public health officials and hospital systems so you know their capacities.

Inventory

Do an inventory of your nonprofits and foundations to figure out who external to government can take part in relief and planning efforts.

Schools

Communicate with people responsible for schools – have a plan for childcare and nutrition as a result of potential school closings.

Teams

Consider splitting staff from every department into two teams; 1 for those who are dealing with what’s happening today, 1 for those who are thinking 2 weeks out about what we need to be worried about down the road.

Status of COVID-19 Cases in the United States

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Total Cases
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Total Deaths
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States Reporting Cases

These data represent cases detected and tested in the United States through U.S. public health surveillance systems since January 21, 2020. This includes both confirmed and presumptive positive cases reported to CDC. It does not include people who returned to the U.S. via State Department-chartered flights.

This data will be updated regularly by 4pm Mondays through Friday. Last Updated on April 1, 2020.

COVID-19: Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

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Travel Related
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Close contact
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Under Investigation
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Total Cases

These data represent cases detected and tested in the United States through U.S. public health surveillance systems since January 21, 2020.  This includes both confirmed and presumptive positive cases reported to CDC. It does not include people who returned to the U.S. via State Department-chartered flights.

† CDC is no longer reporting the number of persons under investigation (PUIs) that have been tested, as well as PUIs that have tested negative. Now that states are testing and reporting their own results, CDC’s numbers are not representative all of testing being done nationwide. For information testing and reporting in your state, please check with your State’s Department of Health

Latest Updates from the Conference

Additional Resources