2005 ADOPTED RESOLUTIONS
CHILDREN, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDHOOD OBESITY

WHEREAS, childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels, with the percent of children who are overweight continuing to increase, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among children and teens ages 6-19, 16 percent (over 9 million) are overweight according to the 1999-2002 data, or triple what the proportion was in 1980; and

WHEREAS, risk factors for heart disease (such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure) and Type II diabetes (previously considered an adult disease) have increased dramatically in overweight and obese children and adolescents, according to the United States Department of Health and Human Services; and

WHEREAS, the most immediate consequence of overweight as perceived by the children themselves is social discrimination, poor self-esteem and depression, according to the United States Department of Health and Human Services; and

WHEREAS, a sensible, healthy eating plan includes a variety of fresh and canned foods especially whole grains, vegetables, and fruits, while limiting portion sizes in foods having high density calories; and

WHEREAS, according to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, contributing factors to overweight or obese children include: lack of physical activity, unhealthy eating patterns or a combination of the two, genetics in playing an important role in determining a child’s weight, and the sedentary, inactive lifestyle in today’s society; and

WHEREAS, numerous studies have demonstrated a direct relationship linking children’s nutrition and wellness with their performance in the classroom (standardized test scores, increased attention and retention) and on the playing field; and

WHEREAS, conscious choices to improve wellness include moderate daily physical activity and nutrition education (awareness of health and nutrition claims, dietary guidelines, serving sizes, and the nutrition facts panel), which are essential to developing effective holistic programs that help students, teachers, and parents make informed decisions that support a healthy lifestyle for a healthier future,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that The U.S. Conference of Mayors dedicates itself to educating its members, constituents and others to address the issue of overweight and obese children; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The U.S. Conference of Mayors supports comprehensive policies addressing childhood obesity which include a multi-faceted approach, promoting and encouraging nutrition education as well as physical activity to combat the sedentary lifestyle that contributes to overweight and obesity in children; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The U.S. Conference of Mayors calls on Congress to enact legislation establishing sound, rational guidelines for state and local governments as well as community leaders that address child obesity as a health epidemic; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this resolution be dispatched to the President of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, Members of Congress, Governors, and other state and local officials as appropriate.

©2005 The U.S. Conference of Mayors
Tom Cochran, Executive Director
1620 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006
Tel. 202.293.7330 ~ Fax 202.293.2352
info@usmayors.org