2004 Adopted Resolutions
72nd Annual Meeting
Boston

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SUPPORT OF A SIX-YEAR WELL-FUNDED METROPOLITAN FOCUSED REAUTHORIZATION OF THE TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY (TEA-21)

     WHEREAS, America’s metropolitan areas, its cities and suburbs, are the engines of our nation’s great economy generating 87% of its economic growth, over $3.8 trillion; and

     WHEREAS, metropolitan areas generate over 85% of the nation’s economic output, labor income and jobs; and

     WHEREAS, in the global marketplace, U.S. metropolitan areas represent 48 of the world’s 100 largest economies; and

     WHEREAS, metropolitan economies need modern infrastructure to secure the nation’s future economic growth; and

     WHEREAS, America needs a 21st Century transportation system that invests in the dramatic expansion of high-capacity public transit systems, addresses aging and congested infrastructure, protects the environment, defends citizen participation and fosters job creation; and

     WHEREAS, stormwater mitigation projects promote environmental stewardship by reducing flooding and polluted runoff from existing highways and other transportation-related activities caused by highway stormwater discharge; and

     WHEREAS, the rising costs of land acquisition for transportation projects makes it increasingly more difficult for localities to attract businesses and residents in an effort to stimulate and sustain economic growth; and

     WHEREAS, maximizing investments in local transit systems leads to relief of traffic congestion and mitigation of pollutant emissions; and

     WHEREAS, by investing transportation funds wisely, we can link our metropolitan areas, reduce traffic congestion, create jobs, and make our new economy (based on the rapid movement of goods and services) function more productively; and

     WHEREAS, the U.S. Department of Transportation Conditions and Performance Report estimates that an average of $75.9 billion per year over the next 20 years will be needed just to maintain the current physical condition and performance of the highway system and to improve the system would require $106.9 billion per year; and

     WHEREAS, the U.S. Department of Transportation Conditions and Performance Report estimates the annual cost to maintain transit infrastructure to be 14.8 billion, and the annual cost to improve the system would require $20.6 billion,

     NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to pass a six-year transportation reauthorization bill that funds core highway and transit programs at no fewer than $318 billion; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to recognize that a transportation reauthorization at a significantly lower level than the Senate approved $318 billion will continue the rapid deterioration of our transportation systems; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to retain the basic principles of TEA-21; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to support the highest possible funding for the transit program to stimulate a dramatic expansion of high-capacity public transit systems, including light rail, heavy rail commuter rail, bus service, dedicated alignment bus rapid transit, express bus services and transit/HOV lanes; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urges the Administration and Congress to support guaranteed funding for the transit program from the general fund, the maintaining of current matching shares for the transit program as authorized under ISTEA and TEA-21 and under no circumstance should the transit program be reduced to increase funding for the highway program; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to fund the core highway program at the highest levels possible, recognizing that congestion is a growing problem costing over $78 billion annually and 32% of our roads are in poor or mediocre condition and that 29% percent of bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to support “Projects of National and Regional Significance” by funding this program at the highest levels possible recognizing that it is difficult for cities and states to dedicate resources to large-scale projects addressing aging, structurally obsolete and congested transportation infrastructure; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to maintain the ISTEA – TEA-21 Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program (CMAQ) and fund at the highest levels possible recognizing the growing number of non-attainment areas designated under the 8-hour ozone and fine particulate matter standards; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress to subject State Departments of Transportation and Metropolitan Planning Organizations to heightened performance and accountability requirements, including regular reporting to the public on how federal transportation funds are being spent, support locally adopted and performance targets and that MPO Board makeup should reflect the jurisdiction that the MPO is representing; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors urge the Administration and Congress as owners and managers of virtually all of the nation’s highways, bridges, and transit systems to suballocate greater surface transportation resources and decision making to metropolitan areas; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the transportation bill should recognize the importance of local government as the organization best fit to disperse and plan the use of funds and where possible the transportation bill should allocate funding directly to local governments; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that transportation funding should continue to recognize the unique needs growing cities and new cities.