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Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act
Full Parity for Substance Abuse Treatment Services
Unsafe Children's Products
Reauthorization of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Older Americans Act Reauthorization
Support of Employment
of Adults with Disabilities

Support for Bipartisan Legislation to Provide Federal Graduate Medical Education Funding to Independent Children's Teaching
Hospitals, and Protecting Our Teaching Hospitals From Medicare Cuts

Helping Our Seniors
Meet The Rising Cost of Prescription Drugs

Enabling Children Adopted Through a State Protection Agency to Receive Financial Aid to Attend Higher Education, and Allowing Foster Children to
Be Declared as a Tax
Deduction

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RESOLUTIONS INDEX

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

REAUTHORIZATION OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (SAMHSA)

WHEREAS, in the next several months, Congress will consider the reauthorization of federal alcohol and drug treatment and prevention programs in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); and

WHEREAS, to effectively fight alcoholism and drug dependence nationwide, treatment and prevention programs must be retained in one federal agency with a focus on alcohol and drug services; and

WHEREAS, alcohol and drug treatment and prevention programs are both effective and cost efficient, as demonstrated in the 1996 National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES), which found sustained reductions in drug use, welfare dependence, and crime and increased employment among 5,700 individuals from publicly funded programs one year after they completed treatment; and

WHEREAS, specifically, NTIES found that:

    Crack use decreased by 50.7 percent and heroin use by 46.5 percent; Employment increased by 18.7 percent and welfare dependence decreased by 10.7 percent; Drug sales decreased by 78.2 percent, physical beating by 77.6 percent, and shoplifting by 81.6 percent; and

WHEREAS, a Cornell University study of 6,000 junior high students in New York State found that students who participate in Life Skills prevention programs are 40 percent less likely to use alcohol and drugs than those who did not participate;

WHEREAS, despite the demonstrated cost-effectiveness of alcohol and drug treatment and prevention, funding for these services still falls short of the need for them, as only 50 percent of the individuals who need treatment receive it; and

WHEREAS, for adolescents the problem is much worse, since only 20 percent of adolescents with severe alcohol and drug problems receive treatment; and

WHEREAS, cities, as ‘first responders,’ shoulder most of the law enforcement, public health, and social costs of drug use, and need some level of direct federal assistance to address drug use in our communities, and to leverage critical additional dollars within the corporate and foundation sectors; and

WHEREAS, while block grants afford states receive significant flexibility in spending funds, accountability and data gathering must nevertheless be required, especially since states are not required to coordinate substance abuse services planning efforts with local governments, and have spent significant time and resources developing data systems to measure alcohol and drug problems, treatment and prevention needs, and the availability and effectiveness of services; and

WHEREAS, a vehicle for distribution of these funds already exists: the Targeted Capacity Treatment Expansion Initiative of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); and

WHEREAS, despite Mayors’ support for increasing funding for the Targeted Capacity Treatment Expansion Initiative, a significant concern has been raised, in that because states and territories are also eligible to receive these funds, the potential of this initiative to fulfill its goals is somewhat diminished--a state’s ability to effectively implement a ‘targeted’ program to expand substance abuse treatment capacity at the local level is problematic, and counterintuitive to what we understand about community outreach,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors calls upon Congress to pass legislation reauthorizing SAMHSA in this session; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Targeted Capacity Expansion programs in CSAT and CSAP should be authorized with separate appropriation levels--at a minimum of $250 million--so that these programs which address underserved populations and emerging drug epidemics will be able to grow and respond to changing needs nationwide; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that The United States Conference of Mayors calls for, at a minimum, $100 million of the Targeted Capacity funds to be earmarked specifically for the improvement and expansion of treatment in cities and counties, and to enhance coordination between city and county governments and service providers; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that SAMHSA reauthorization must include the establishment of State Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Planning Councils, and that local government officials, members of the alcohol and drug treatment and prevention field, and treatment and prevention consumers and their families serve on these councils with representative of state government to help ensure that federal funds are being spent efficiently and that services throughout a state are coordinated and provided to all populations in need.

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